Teaching: M&P1 -- Reflecting "out loud"

With this post I hope to initiate a series of reflections on how I am approaching the Media & Politics course at UNH for the Spring 2016 term. Read More…
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Teaching: Assessing Flipped Course Failure: Part 2

More on failed flipping experience. Read More…
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Teaching: Assessing Flipped Course Failure: Part 1

The failed flipping experience analyzed. Read More…
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Teaching: A Failed Flip

A report on a well-intentioned effort…. Read More…
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Comment/Teaching:Myths, vaccines, teaching

Some thoughts on myths, vaccinations and teaching American government. Read More…
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Teaching: Plan B

Over the past two weeks I have been putting my “flipped course” plan into action. The week before classes (which started on the 20th) was focused on filling in the details on the “syllabus” and sending annoying emails to students via the Blackboard site asking them to view three videos I posted that went over some of the logistics of the course. I was convinced these annoying emails would result in some drops when the class began, but instead I have gone from initial enrollment of 56 to 64 -- which is the capacity for the way I structured things. First week of classes turned out to be mostly lecturing-as-usual, but the focus was on the course and getting groups organized. Heading into second week, however, I’ve come up against the major snow storm hitting New England tonight and tomorrow. Classes have already been cancelled, but interestingly the flipped course moves forward under what I am dubbing Plan B.
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Teaching: Ending distractions

As I work through the idea of flipping my American government course, I need to confront the role of ICT in the classroom setting.
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Teaching: Rationalizing the textbook

The role of the primary textbook is the American government course varies. The question for the course flipping instructor is what kind of textbook (if any) is best suited for the role. I am the co-author of the book I will use in the course (of course), but in this post I am going to attempt to articulate some points to consider when looking at the many alternatives.
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Teaching: Flipping the Baby?

Flipping a course is a radical step for anyone who has relied on the traditional lecture approach for years -- actually, for decades. Because I have taught a few online and hybrid course, moving lectures online is not a concern. What is troubling me is the prospect of giving up a somewhat successful (albeit idiosyncratic) instructional tool I’ve relied on over the past few years -- the “Discussion Forum,” or “DFs”. Read More…
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Teaching: Practicing my Kingsfield Retort

It is clear that flipping my American government course will work only if I alter my assumptions and expectations about student preparation for class sessions. The “unflipped” me is pretty cynical when it comes to student preparation -- and perhaps this has been a self-fulfilling prophesy since I’ve always organized my syllabus on the assumption that unless there is some incentive in place (e.g., the threat of a quiz) most students do not bother reading the text until the night before an exam -- and even then you wonder if they actually went beyond skimming through the chapters or assigned readings. Obviously, for in-class discussions and other activities to work, I will have to assume otherwise. Read More…
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Teaching: The Flipping Challenge

As I contemplate posting my course syllabus for the coming semester, the central question I face is whether a college-level American government course can be "flipped". Read More…
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